Events

National Heroes Day

National Heroes’ Day refers to a number of commemorations of national heroes in different countries. In the Philippines, we celebrate it every fourth Monday of August. This year, we celebrate it as an August 26 holiday.

In line with this, read President Rodrigo Duterte’s message this National Heroes’ Day.

The president calls everyone “to reflect on our history and honor the brave souls who courageously fought for our freedom.”

“I truly believe that every Filipino is a hero who can build on our vibrant legacy of fortitude and resilience,” he added.

National Heroes Day

As per Presidential Proclamation No. 555, August 21, 2019 is declared as a Special Non-working Day.

Ninoy Aquino Day – Philippine Holiday

Ninoy Aquino Day is a national non-working holiday in the Philippines observed annually on August 21, commemorating the assassination of former Senator Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino, Jr. He was the husband of Corazon Aquino, who was later to become Philippine President; they are treated as two of the heroes of democracy in the country. His assassination led to the downfall of President Ferdinand Marcos on February 25, 1986, through the People Power Revolution.

As per Presidential Proclamation No. 555, August 21, 2019 is declared as a Special Non-working Day.

#NinoyAquinoDay

Eid al-Fitr

The festival of Eid al-Fitr, the Festival of Fast breaking, marks the end of Ramadan.

Religious festival observed globally by Muslims.

Malacañang has declared December 26, 2016 and January 2, 2017 as special non-working holidays, per Presidential Proclamation No. 117.

January 2, 2017 special non-working holiday

Malacañang has declared December 26, 2016 and January 2, 2017 as special non-working holidays, per Presidential Proclamation No. 117.

The declaration of such dates, both falling on a Monday, as special non-working days will give Filipinos “full opportunity to celebrate the holidays with their families and loves ones,” it stated.

A “longer weekend promotes domestic tourism and enables employers to plan their work schedules effectively and efficiently, resulting in improved productivity,” the Proclamation added.

Malacañang has declared December 26, 2016 and January 2, 2017 as special non-working holidays, per Presidential Proclamation No. 117.

Dec. 26 special non-working holiday

Malacañang has declared December 26, 2016 and January 2, 2017 as special non-working holidays, per Presidential Proclamation No. 117.

The declaration of such dates, both falling on a Monday, as special non-working days will give Filipinos “full opportunity to celebrate the holidays with their families and loves ones,” it stated.

A “longer weekend promotes domestic tourism and enables employers to plan their work schedules effectively and efficiently, resulting in improved productivity,” the Proclamation added.

Here’s the full text:

Bonifacio Day

Bonifacio Day.  Commemorates the birth of Andrés Bonifacio on 30 November 1863.

Black Saturday

March 26, 2016 – Black Saturday (Special non-working day)

All Saints Day

All Saints Day

When is All Saint’s Day?

All Saints’ Day is generally celebrated on 1st November as a commemoration day for all Christian saints. It may also be known as All Hallows’ Day, Solemnity of All Saints, Hallowmas, or Feast of Saints.

Traditions of All Saints’ Day

The origin of All Saints’ Day may date back to a Greek Christian tradition from the 4th century, when a festival was held to honor saints and martyrs on the Sunday following Pentecost.

The first recorded All Saints’ Day occurred on 13 May 609 CE when Pope Boniface IV accepted the Pantheon in Rome as a gift from the Emperor Phocas. The Pope dedicated the day as a holiday to honour the Blessed Virgin and all the martyrs.

In 835 CE, during the reign of Pope Gregory III, the festival was moved to 1st November and was expanded to include the honouring of all saints. It is likely that 1st November was intentionally chosen to replace the pagan feast of the dead, Samhain. The night before Samhain was a time when evil spirits roamed the land looking for humans. To confuse the spirits, people would dress up as creatures. This tradition carried on after 1 November became a Christian festival, hence the name of Halloween – which is a shortened version of All Hallows’ Eve.

The day survived the Reformation, though the Protestants combined it with All Souls’ Day, which was on 2nd November.

The day was abolished as a church festival in 1770, but may be celebrated by many churches on the first Sunday in November.

In Roman Catholicism, All Saints’ Day is a Holy Day of Obligation. This means Catholics must go to Mass on the date unless there is a good reason not to attend, such as illness. The holiday is typically observed with a reading of the Beatitudes, eight blessings given in Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount as recounted in the Gospel of Matthew.

In recent years, it has become common in many churches to commemorate those who died during the year on the day itself.

The tradition of placing candles on the graves the evening before All Saints’ Eve is becoming more common.

All Saints Day around the world

Finland, Sweden

In Finland and Sweden, All Saints Day is celebrated on the Saturday between 31 October and 6 November.

Netherlands

In the Netherlands, this holiday is observed on the first Sunday in November, but it is not a public holiday.